Why Dystopian?

Crossroads, my current project and first novel-sized work, is in the genre I call Christian dystopian. As I’ve rewritten, reread, and reconsidered it, I have been caused to examine its deepest elements.

This has led me to answer the question, why dystopian?

For one, the genre is interesting and popular. I wonder, why is it so popular, especially among young adults? Is that merely a product of marketing? No, I believe it stems directly from a fundamental issue of our generation. We are scared.

I write dystopian because it’s real. It is has been real and is becoming even more real. The dystopian world, the setting, is a mere exaggeration of life as we know it. It is the progression of every circumstance.

The evil, all too controlling government that many countries know today is aided to the extreme by technological advancements. The globalist government is the final fulfillment of today’s political problems. Nuclear capabilities have existed since 1945. Superbugs are even more frightening (sickening actually). What about the stories where the economies have collapsed? Double the effect of the 1929 depression. And there is only a fraction of the world’s current population left? Our future generations will be wiped out by unchecked abortion, assisted suicide, and euthanization.

We are on a road, the same one we’ve been on since the fall. God, in His mercy, has placed two setbacks in this destructive course: the flood and the cross. But each time the devil and his minions have fought hard against the renewing effects.

In our day, Christians are persecuted. Be it death in the east or ridicule and regulations in the west. Take the widespread, top-down animosity toward Christianity in the United States, and multiply it. How many generations will it take?

I cannot pretend to tell the future. God can reverse the downward spiral again in the near future. But without His grace, humanity is going down in judgment. And we are scared.

Which brings me back to Crossroads It is not prophetic of the way things will be; but it is an encouragement to young people that even in the midst of impending hardship, there is hope, there is victory. This book isn’t about the oppressive government or the heroism of the protagonists. It is about being broken to the point of dependence on God, and it is about Heaven. That is our hope and our victory.

On a final note, when I observe what has been created in the dystopian genre and what has created it, I am saddened by the answers. My secondary purpose for Crossroads is to buy back the dystopian genre with a distinctly Christian worldview. In a somewhat allegorical form, it should equip my readers with a biblical mindset in dealing with our world, politics, and circumstances today.

Postscript: (because I’m bad at closing thoughts) if you’re unfamiliar with the Christian dystopian genre, I recommend you check out my review of Counted Worthy by Leah Good.

 

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6 thoughts on “Why Dystopian?

  1. I agree with you 100%! The world is on a downhill slide, and we need to have a strong faith in God. Christian dystopian is an amazing genre. I haven’t read any (I keep on meaning to read Counted Worthy, but I haven’t gotten to it), but it sounds simply amazing. People need to hear that message.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. I agree with you! The world is falling down, and it seems that while it runs off the cliff, it insists that it’s only going up… As the Bible says, right will be wrong, and wrong will be right…
    I stay away from most dystopian books because of how it twists the truth…. there is not future without God, apocalypse or no!
    Your book Crossroads sounds very interesting, Paul.

    Liked by 1 person

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